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Why I Write Across Genres

 Why I Write Across Genres

by Beth Trissel




Many authors wisely choose a genre and stick with it. Most historical romance authors master a specific time period, such as Regency England, and set up camp there. They learn the drill and can summon appropriate dress, manners, transport…without a second thought. Not me. Like a restless spirit, I wander about. Writing would be far easier if I’d stay put, but not, I expect, as much fun. So I write both historical, with varying time periods and settings, and light paranormal romance, generally with a time travel or ghost in the fantasy meld. If I were to choose a favorite era it would probably be colonial America, but I also love others. Research into my early American ancestors and their interaction with Native Americans (some were taken captive) inspired my historicals set in the colonial frontier,
Red Bird’s Song, Through the Fire and my upcoming November release, Kira, Daughter of the Moon, and a spinoff of that theme in my upcoming December release, A Warrior for Christmas. Family involvement in the American Revolution led to my writing historical romance novel Enemy of the King. 

The connection I feel to the past and those who’ve gone before me is the ongoing inspiration behind all my work. I’ve done a great deal of research into family genealogy and come from well-documented English/Scots-Irish folk with a smidgen of French in the meld, a Norman knight who sailed with William the Conqueror. One line goes back to Geoffrey Chaucer. And there’s a puritan line with involvement in the Salem Witch Trials—my apologies to Susannah Martin’s descendants—but that’s another story. With my historical romance
Into the Lion’s Heart, I more deeply explored my British ancestry, and The French Revolution. I don’t think our family lost any heads back then but it’s a fascinating time period and figures heavily in the story. 

In my light paranormal romance novel
The Bearwalker’s Daughter I ventured into the shape shifting realm with a bearwalking Shawnee warrior. Depending upon whom you consult among the Shawnee, they may not consider this to be fantasy but an actual ability some of their people possess, or used to in ages past. The Bearwalker’s Daughter also has a magical moonstone necklace which I wish I could’ve kept, but the novel sucked in that prize and won’t let me have it back. Bummer.

Scottish time travel romance Somewhere My Lass was a departure for me in that I also wove sci-fi elements into the story. My paranormals require the same research I’d do for a historical because there are other time periods to explore, and then the added contemplation involved in otherworldly elements, so they are not easy, but enjoyable in a challenging way. The concept behind my Somewhere series, is that the story opens in present day, so far my home state of Virginia, and then transports the reader Somewhere else. Either back to an earlier time in the same house, as in Somewhere My Love and Somewhere The Bells Ring, or another place altogether, as in Somewhere My Lass. The wonderful old homes I grew up in and visited over the years are an integral part of the inspiration behind this series. In Somewhere My Lass, I used a compilation of Victorian homes for the mysterious house in historic Staunton, Virginia where the story begins. How do they go back and forth in time, you ask? Why through the ‘door to nowhere,’ of course, a portal to the past. I was acquainted with just such a door as a child.

For more on me, my blog is the happening place:
https://bethtrissel.wordpress.com/ 


Visit Beth's Website http://www.bethtrissel.com/

Purchase  Beth's books from the AdC Bookstore

Purchase Somewhere My Lass




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Cathy Stewart said...

Great post, Beth! Lol! It's no wonder you write multiple historical periods! You have a varied and colorful ancestry. How wonderful you've found such delight in it.

Posted July 9, 2012 07:01 PM | Reply to this comment

Beth Trissel said...

Very true. Thanks so much, Cathy.

Posted July 9, 2012 07:10 PM | Reply to this comment

Miriam Newman said...

Beth, I think the ability to weave our family stories and interests into our tales is one of the biggest benefits of becoming a writer. Yours have been a delight to many readers. Please continue! :)

Posted July 9, 2012 07:48 PM | Reply to this comment

Vonnie Davis said...

Lovely post, Beth. I understand your sliding from one genre to another since I seem to do it, too. I like to think our creative spirits are too versatle, too hungry for knowlege, too easily bored to camp out in one genre. Your wide range of writing has served you well--and your readers, too.

Posted July 9, 2012 07:56 PM | Reply to this comment

Calisa said...

I think it's wonderful you can write historical and weave family lines into them, Beth. Writing vintage and contemporary is about as historical as I get.

Posted July 9, 2012 08:41 PM | Reply to this comment

Gerri Bowen said...

Great post, Beth. You may write across genre, but they are all great stories.

Posted July 9, 2012 08:51 PM | Reply to this comment

Tami Dee said...

Great post, Beth! I'm like you in that I like to write diffrent things. 'The many moods of Tami' is how I view me. lol I change the look of my web site ALL the time. hahhaha

Posted July 9, 2012 09:08 PM | Reply to this comment

LaVerne Clark said...

The only common theme I've found in each story I've read of yours is strong writing and a wonderful storytelling ability. I've loved them all so far :) I'm looking forward to reading whats up next!

Posted July 9, 2012 09:11 PM | Reply to this comment

Beth Trissel replied to LaVerne Clark...

Thanks so much, LaVerne. Very appreciated.

Posted July 10, 2012 05:49 AM | Reply to this comment

Beth Trissel replied to Tami Dee...

That's a good reason too, Tami. :) And thanks!

Posted July 10, 2012 05:50 AM | Reply to this comment

Beth Trissel replied to Miriam Newman...

That's a great insight Miriam, and thanks.

Posted July 10, 2012 05:51 AM | Reply to this comment

Beth trissel replied to Vonnie Davis...

Thanks Vonnie. I suspect you have the truth of it.

Posted July 10, 2012 05:54 AM | Reply to this comment

Beth Trissel replied to Calisa...

Thanks Calisa. I think it's interesting how some authors like me naturally gravitate toward historical while others can't fathom going there. Writing straight contemporary seems beyond me. We all have our unique draws.

Posted July 10, 2012 05:56 AM | Reply to this comment

Beth Trissel replied to Gerri Bowen...

Thanks Gerri. Very kind. :)

Posted July 10, 2012 05:58 AM | Reply to this comment

Sandra Dailey said...

I envy your ability. My characters just don't want to go there. They're all about the here and now. But, I do love reading about all these time periods. It's so clear that you've done your homework.

Posted July 10, 2012 08:30 AM | Reply to this comment

Ilona Fridl said...

I know I write historicals, because I love research. I have found out things I never knew before.

Posted July 10, 2012 10:03 AM | Reply to this comment

Beth Trissel said...

Yes, amazing how much you learn.

Posted July 10, 2012 11:06 AM | Reply to this comment

Pam said...

I love it when authors get out of their comfort zone and zingggggg write awesome books regardless of the genre. Beth is an incredible author. I've just started reading Somewhere My Love and didn't want to put it down. Alas, here I am goofing off when I should be working. :-))

Posted July 10, 2012 11:28 AM | Reply to this comment

Diana Cosby said...

Interesting post Beth. Your weaving of your past with historical research is a powerful combination. My sincere best to you, and I wish you continued success!

Posted July 10, 2012 12:53 PM | Reply to this comment

anita clenney said...

Beth, your family genealogy is fascinating. I wish I knew more about my ancestors. I know very little, which is a shame. I know I'm 1/8 Cherokee, but don't know much else. As far as genres, I don't do historical, although there is some time travel involved in some books, but I love mystery and romance and always have both. And there's always something paranormal going on. I can't seem to keep it out of my writing.

Posted July 10, 2012 02:18 PM | Reply to this comment

anita clenney said...

Beth, your family genealogy is fascinating. I wish I knew more about my ancestors. I know very little, which is a shame. I know I'm 1/8 Cherokee, but don't know much else. As far as genres, I don't do historical, although there is some time travel involved in some books, but I love mystery and romance and always have both. And there's always something paranormal going on. I can't seem to keep it out of my writing.

Posted July 10, 2012 02:18 PM | Reply to this comment

Beth Trissel replied to anita clenney...

Thanks Anita. My daughter in law is also part Cherokee. Very interesting, I think. Although I love historicals, paranormal elements hold a lot of appeal for me too.

Posted July 10, 2012 03:16 PM | Reply to this comment

Beth Trissel replied to Diana Cosby...

Thanks Diana. I've never written a setting where my ancestors didn't venture. At least, not yet.

Posted July 10, 2012 03:17 PM | Reply to this comment

Beth Trissel replied to Pam...

Thanks so much, Pam. High praise indeed.

Posted July 10, 2012 03:18 PM | Reply to this comment

JC Page (Jennifer) said...

What a beautiful inspiration Beth! I can sense your love of history and family in your work. What a wonderful gift to readers and your children!

Posted July 10, 2012 03:54 PM | Reply to this comment

Mary Ricksen said...

I love your books Beth and I like a bit of variety myself!!!

Posted July 10, 2012 05:00 PM | Reply to this comment

Beth Trissel replied to JC Page (Jennifer)...

Thanks so much! Variety is great.

Posted July 10, 2012 08:18 PM | Reply to this comment

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